ABOUT MCC

MCC PRESIDENT

PRESIDENT'S CORNER

PRESIDENT'S CORNER

“As educators, the next normal should be our new goal to define and to succeed on”

Dr. Michelle Aguilar-Ong, MCC President

ON INTERNATIONALIZATION

ON INTERNATIONALIZATION

(An Excerpt from the President’s Speech during Texas and Education USA Orientation 2021) - May 18, 2021

You see, there are so many things that can divide us, but there are also so many things that can unite us. And why should we choose the former when we are given the choice or opportunity to better understand the world we are living in? Mabalacat City College chooses the path of understanding, so we embark on internationalization.

Oftentimes this kind of activity is only for state and private universities, probably because of fear that community colleges have little to offer.

However, as we look closely, community colleges actually have so much to offer in understanding the world. Community colleges or local colleges as we refer to them in the Philippines, are rich venues of grassroots information on almost anything on social sciences and developmental studies, genuinely preserved culture that dates back in many centuries ago, backyard industries that can inspire great business ideas and so much more.

Those things are what brought us here today. We have so much to share and learn from each other.

Apart from that, this world had suffered enough. Every day we hear news on oppression, on inequality and about victims of war, of terrorism, of human rights violation. These are products of misunderstanding that one idea is superior above others. Through international exchanges we teach our students the appreciation to understand the world from many voices, and to learn that diversity is in fact a set of different truths which are equally valid just like their own truth at home. If we can do this together, then perhaps, it will be a better and a kinder world for the next generation because the students we teach today shall lead them.

You see, there are so many things that can divide us, but there are also so many things that can unite us. And why should we choose the former when we are given the choice or opportunity to better understand the world we are living in? Mabalacat City College chooses the path of understanding, so we embark on internationalization.

Oftentimes this kind of activity is only for state and private universities, probably because of fear that community colleges have little to offer.

However, as we look closely, community colleges actually have so much to offer in understanding the world. Community colleges or local colleges as we refer to them in the Philippines, are rich venues of grassroots information on almost anything on social sciences and developmental studies, genuinely preserved culture that dates back in many centuries ago, backyard industries that can inspire great business ideas and so much more.

Those things are what brought us here today. We have so much to share and learn from each other.

Apart from that, this world had suffered enough. Every day we hear news on oppression, on inequality and about victims of war, of terrorism, of human rights violation. These are products of misunderstanding that one idea is superior above others. Through international exchanges we teach our students the appreciation to understand the world from many voices, and to learn that diversity is in fact a set of different truths which are equally valid just like their own truth at home. If we can do this together, then perhaps, it will be a better and a kinder world for the next generation because the students we teach today shall lead them.

OUR COMMUNITY EFFORTS

OUR COMMUNITY EFFORTS

Consequence-Based Response on Student Services for Balance-Development in this Pandemic Time

More than a year into this pandemic reveals that shifting our mode of learning is merely not enough. The pivots we took led us to a whole new different path and that, it wasn’t just a diversion as we’ve expected it to be. We have to realize that online is here to stay. If we don’t, then we are not only losing relevance but might put our students to harm.

When we shifted to online learning, mental health became an issue. We have to accept that the modality itself is the primary source of this stress. Connectivity issues, compatibility of equipment, limited interaction, back strain, eye problems are just few of the things that makes online learning stressful. With all these organizations offering webinars for additional learning, we just have to decline. Yes, they mean well but we are running the risk of exposing our students more to the very toxic that causes their stress. We just can’t accommodate every webinar request even if it is about mental health itself. Exposing them more is aggravating the issue.

If online learning provided platform for academic requirements, we need to shift paradigm on student services too, and it might just be the opposite. During face-to-face, we gave them seminars on topics ranging from environmental, gender, leadership and even mental health. That is because what they needed then was knowledge about these things. Now, information is at their fingertip. We introduced them to a platform that made all these information available to them. Then why do we still bombard them with additional online activities loaded with the same information? What students need now is the opportunity to be a social being because, they are. We want our students to feel normal, be normal even for such a short time, we want them to relax, to look at nature, appreciate colors and break the pattern of this zombie-like living. These are the consequences that we aspire our student services programs to effect on them. For example, we want them to move away from the source of the stress, then our instructions should bring them outdoor even if it’s just at their doorstep to stare at the cloud or to merely look at the window beyond 20 meters. If we follow this consequence-based response paradigm, schools become the enablers of these experiences to be normal again.

Point is, online learning is the way to go and that is non-negotiable at the moment. Schools have to create the balance and through consequence-based responses on the student services, we give our students alternative ways for a balanced and normal development under this current situation.

More than a year into this pandemic reveals that shifting our mode of learning is merely not enough. The pivots we took led us to a whole new different path and that, it wasn’t just a diversion as we’ve expected it to be. We have to realize that online is here to stay. If we don’t, then we are not only losing relevance but might put our students to harm.

When we shifted to online learning, mental health became an issue. We have to accept that the modality itself is the primary source of this stress. Connectivity issues, compatibility of equipment, limited interaction, back strain, eye problems are just few of the things that makes online learning stressful. With all these organizations offering webinars for additional learning, we just have to decline. Yes, they mean well but we are running the risk of exposing our students more to the very toxic that causes their stress. We just can’t accommodate every webinar request even if it is about mental health itself. Exposing them more is aggravating the issue.

If online learning provided platform for academic requirements, we need to shift paradigm on student services too, and it might just be the opposite. During face-to-face, we gave them seminars on topics ranging from environmental, gender, leadership and even mental health. That is because what they needed then was knowledge about these things. Now, information is at their fingertip. We introduced them to a platform that made all these information available to them. Then why do we still bombard them with additional online activities loaded with the same information? What students need now is the opportunity to be a social being because, they are. We want our students to feel normal, be normal even for such a short time, we want them to relax, to look at nature, appreciate colors and break the pattern of this zombie-like living. These are the consequences that we aspire our student services programs to effect on them. For example, we want them to move away from the source of the stress, then our instructions should bring them outdoor even if it’s just at their doorstep to stare at the cloud or to merely look at the window beyond 20 meters. If we follow this consequence-based response paradigm, schools become the enablers of these experiences to be normal again.

Point is, online learning is the way to go and that is non-negotiable at the moment. Schools have to create the balance and through consequence-based responses on the student services, we give our students alternative ways for a balanced and normal development under this current situation.

ABOUT THE PRESIDENT

ABOUT THE PRESIDENT

Mich is the College President of Mabalacat City College. Under her leadership, the college has introduced many innovative strategies in responding to the challenge of the pandemic both in the academic and work sphere of the institution. One of her most notable innovation and the first in the Philippines, is the setup of digital hubs in clustered villages. This project gives equal access of education to students without internet and gadgets at home. As an executive who puts people as priority, she started the employee’s wellness program which dramatically transformed the institution as a high performing environment. She also believes in spatial learning, effect of collaborative environment to innovative thinking, and student-centered approach which led to major physical changes of the two campuses of the college.

Mich is a visiting professor at the graduate school of Don Honorio Ventura State University Teaching Public Policy Research and Organizational Management. She is also one of the pioneering faculty-coaches for the Design Thinking Work Integrated Program of both the MPA and MBA courses in the same university.

Formerly, the Executive Director of Nayong Pilipino Foundation, an attached agency of the Department of Tourism. Before that, she used to be the Assistant Executive Director of Project Redland of Clark Development Corporation wherein she formulated the resonant approach for humane resettlement. Mich had a three-year stint in television as a host of a weekly public affairs program of GNNTV 44 that started in 2014. Until now, she still does guest hosting from time to time in various programs.

When asked for major contribution, Mich said that the Juana-at-Work policy she authored makes her the proudest. The policy recognizes the family responsibility of a working mother even while at work. It contains provisions for nap time, flexible schedule, priority grant of leave, and taking calls which are beneficial to women. Moreover, she is currently working on the passing of a policy for the protection and preservation of the Balakat trees in Mabalacat City to which the name of the city was derived. To date, it already passed its first reading.

She earned her degree of BA Behavioral Sciences at the University of the Philippines-Manila. She took her Masterate and Doctorate degrees in Public Administration at Don Honorio Ventura State University and was awarded meritissimus for both. She trained as coach at Chartered Management Institute of London.

Mich is described by her colleagues as tenacious and decisive.

Mich is the College President of Mabalacat City College. Under her leadership, the college has introduced many innovative strategies in responding to the challenge of the pandemic both in the academic and work sphere of the institution. One of her most notable innovation and the first in the Philippines, is the setup of digital hubs in clustered villages. This project gives equal access of education to students without internet and gadgets at home. As an executive who puts people as priority, she started the employee’s wellness program which dramatically transformed the institution as a high performing environment. She also believes in spatial learning, effect of collaborative environment to innovative thinking, and student-centered approach which led to major physical changes of the two campuses of the college.

Mich is a visiting professor at the graduate school of Don Honorio Ventura State University Teaching Public Policy Research and Organizational Management. She is also one of the pioneering faculty-coaches for the Design Thinking Work Integrated Program of both the MPA and MBA courses in the same university.

Formerly, the Executive Director of Nayong Pilipino Foundation, an attached agency of the Department of Tourism. Before that, she used to be the Assistant Executive Director of Project Redland of Clark Development Corporation wherein she formulated the resonant approach for humane resettlement. Mich had a three-year stint in television as a host of a weekly public affairs program of GNNTV 44 that started in 2014. Until now, she still does guest hosting from time to time in various programs.

When asked for major contribution, Mich said that the Juana-at-Work policy she authored makes her the proudest. The policy recognizes the family responsibility of a working mother even while at work. It contains provisions for nap time, flexible schedule, priority grant of leave, and taking calls which are beneficial to women. Moreover, she is currently working on the passing of a policy for the protection and preservation of the Balakat trees in Mabalacat City to which the name of the city was derived. To date, it already passed its first reading.

She earned her degree of BA Behavioral Sciences at the University of the Philippines-Manila. She took her Masterate and Doctorate degrees in Public Administration at Don Honorio Ventura State University and was awarded meritissimus for both. She trained as coach at Chartered Management Institute of London.

Mich is described by her colleagues as tenacious and decisive.

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